Cool runnings

policymic:

American Indian Rapper SupaMan was just named as an MTV Artist of the Week

The news: Christian Parrish Takes the Gun. Remember his name.

The Apsáalooke American Indian hails from the Crow Nation Reservation near Billings, Mont., and on March 21, the MTV Iggy blog named him Artist of the Week from among hundreds of competitors.

What makes him special? Well, he raps under the name “SupaMan,” he sings, he makes crazy drum loops, he’s a champion powwow fancy dancer and sometimes, if you’re lucky, he does all four at the same time.

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clunce:

I love ass so much

astrodidact:

This really isn’t surprising when you consider the fact that a lot of people prefer to be entertained than be informed. Gone are the days of the real History Channel…The Learning Channel(TLC), etc. I don’t know for sure if this is an intentional “dumbing down” of the American public, or if the majority of people in this country just prefer to be fucking ignorant…I don’t know, but the crap that is on tv today is certainly a reflection of what people want to see. And it’s mainly the shit on the right, not the left.

astrodidact:

This really isn’t surprising when you consider the fact that a lot of people prefer to be entertained than be informed. Gone are the days of the real History Channel…The Learning Channel(TLC), etc. I don’t know for sure if this is an intentional “dumbing down” of the American public, or if the majority of people in this country just prefer to be fucking ignorant…I don’t know, but the crap that is on tv today is certainly a reflection of what people want to see. And it’s mainly the shit on the right, not the left.

I’m becoming more silent these days. I’m speaking less and less in public. But my eyes, god damn, my eyes see everything.
(via protective)

madeupmonkeyshit:

when you pushing out the fart

then you realize it aint fart

image

You have to be odd to be number one.

Dr. Seuss

This changed me

(via reveriesofawriter)

For instance, the World Bank is essentially an American instrument, and the United States is a food-surplus nation threatened with loss of foreign markets for farm products as modernization of European agriculture proceeds. For the World Bank to finance such institutional reforms in developing nations as would lead them toward self-sufficiency on food account would run counter to American interests. U.S. farm surpluses would become unmanageable as the overseas market for U.S. farm products dwindled. Hence, the World Bank prefers perpetuation of world poverty to the development of adequate overseas capacity to feed the peoples of developing countries.

There is a yet more subtle point to be considered. Mineral resources represent diminishing assets. It is in the interest of developing peoples to conserve such assets for their own ultimate use in manufacturing industries, as these develop within the borders of nations rich in raw materials but backward in general development. In the short run such domestic use of mineral resources is not possible because of inadequate industrial capital and consumer markets place. The specter is thus raised that in the long run these countries will find themselves depleted of resources as World Bank programs accelerate the exploitation of their mineral deposits for use by other nations.

The long-term prospect is thus for these countries to be unable to earn foreign exchange on export account sufficient to finance their required food imports. The World Bank has foreseen this. Its proposals for population limitation in these countries is a cold-blooded attempt to extort from them their mineral resources, without assuming responsibility for the sustenance of these peoples once the industrialized West has stripped them of their fuel and mineral deposits.

Consider the alternative, that World Bank loans and technical assistance foster agricultural self-sufficiency among these peoples. Assume substantial success in this endeavor in, say, a decade. Thereafter, exportation of fuels and minerals would become a matter of choice by these peoples, not a necessity. Such export might continue at current levels; it might increase, or it might diminish. The decision to conserve or to dissipate exhaustible resources would be autonomous, a matter of choice by these peoples and their governments, not something imposed upon them from outside. The decision about desirable levels of population also would be a local matter, not something demanded among the terms on which capital resources are obtained from foreign suppliers. The peoples now dependent would escape that trap. This is not intended or desired either by the World Bank or by the government of the United States and its client regimes….

Excessive industrialization in the United States, coupled with increasingly wasteful uses of resources on armaments and on personal luxuries that are essentially trivial in terms of human well-being, makes essential the U.S. exploitation of the developing countries, their resources and peoples. The United States is in deficit on raw-materials account, but is unwilling to limit its industrial expansion correspondingly. It is in surplus on farm products account, but is unwilling to limit its agriculture accordingly. The peoples of developing countries therefore are to be turned into the instrument through which the otherwise untenable U.S. economic process is perpetuated.

Michael Hudson | Super-Imperialism

jp morgan fired him for writing this stuff in the early 70s

(via antoine-roquentin)

fallujah:

Alex Hofmann
Fallujah

fallujah:

Alex Hofmann

Fallujah

Once we were blobs in the sea, and then fishes, and then lizards and rats and then monkeys, and hundreds of things in between. This hand was once a fin, this hand once had claws! In my human mouth I have the pointy teeth of a wolf and the chisel teeth of a rabbit and the grinding teeth of a cow! Our blood is as salty as the sea we used to live in! When we’re frightened, the hair on our skin stands up, just like it did when we had fur. We are history! Everything we’ve ever been on the way to becoming us, we still are.

I’m made up of the memories of my parents and my grandparents, all my ancestors. They’re in the way I look, in the colour of my hair. And I’m made up of everyone I’ve ever met who’s changed the way I think.

Terry Pratchett

So inspiring!

(via whats-out-there)

cophinescockerspaniels:

what even were the 90s